15 January 2011

questions

There's a name for this type of food prep where you get all the ingredients ready, arrayed in separate bowls. Someone told me once and I thought I'd committed it to memory, but it isn't in my brain any more.  It's one of those phrases like mise en scene, that can't be rediscovered via google.
Anyway, it's been bugging me, anyone know what I'm talking about?

Also, I was wondering is anyone has recommendations for washing wool skirts?
All the skirts I liked in the thrift store today fit me perfectly (when does that happen?) so I find myself with  a couple new, woolen skirts that don't have care labels in them.
I googled and found a wide variety of suggestions: from soaking in the bathtub in many changes of water, one of which has vinegar to a pretty standard soak with detergenty water, rinse until free of soap.

I haven't worn wool in the past because gives me a rash if it is in contact with my skin, but these skirts are lined and I'll wear them with tights and long underwear, so I think my skin won't mind them.  At $4 each, I figured it was worth a try!

17 comments:

  1. From my experience, lined wool skirts should be dry cleaned. The lining fabric will shrink and get all wrinkly if it gets wet.

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  2. hi rossie, you are thinking of mise en place (wikipedia link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mise_en_place) - as for the skirts i have washed wool suiting and I think if you keep the water tepid and dont have any rapid changes in temperature you should avoid shrinkage - good luck from another rossie

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  3. as to the food prep, looks like you have a good answer. Personally I'd call it debbie proof. My memory is so short I have to do things that way or end up with oops!

    The lining of your skirt should be poly. Keep the water tepid. I have a close friend that has sheep, spins her own yarn and such. When I asked her she said wool shrinks when it is shocked by temperature change, so wash it in room temp water. the other issue is the ph of the soap you use. Wool is hair and just like if you wash your hair in something that is very drying and it gets frizzy, so will wool. If the cuticle is shocked by temp or ph it will shrink and felt. If that happens...just send it to me :o). LOts of luck, you can do it.

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  4. i think it's mire pois or something like that...

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  5. Woolite? Maybe lightly wash in the tub with tepid water and roll in towels to soak up the water, lay flat block the shape like you would a sweater to dry? Or dry clean.

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  6. It's called mise en place :) Alton Brown loves that expression.

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  7. mise en place (MEEZ ahn plahs) This technique is IMPORTANT and one that's hardest to get novice cooks to stick with. It's a French term for having all your ingredients prepped and ready to go before starting you start cooking. That means everything is cleaned, peeled, chopped, diced, measured out, whatever's necessary to get the ingredients ready prior to preparing your dish. Many of us, me included, start cooking and prepping at the same time. A big NO NO. Try to get into the habit of mis en place. Too read more about mise en place, click here
    http://www.reluctantgourmet.com/atoz.htm

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  8. Use a wool wash. Soak in cold water. rinse well. Press excess water out don't squeeze it. Then dry flat. That's the official version. Or you can do my what DH does with his lined wool trousers - wool wash, wool cycle on the washing machine, dry on the line. Good luck

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  9. I love the idea of mise en place, but it takes more time and makes a lot more dirty dishes - not good things when you are cooking for a family every day. Great plan when you are trying new, complicated recipes.

    Good luck with washing the skirts!

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  10. mise en place...everything in place...makes it so much easier to cook with my kids...

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  11. I wash all my wool in the machine. Even "dry clean" stuff and it's all fine. Like previous commenters said, avoid hot water. And of course don't do the dryer. If I have something that seems a little more fragile or whatever, I put it in a lingerie bag to keep it from getting stretched out or anything.

    Happy washing! $4 wool skirts = YAY!

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  12. My machine has a wool cycle, love that. Failing this, what "I like orange too" said. When rolling in towels, don't be too aggressive and dry flat after pulling into shape.

    Also don't soak!

    No need to dry-clean ... ;-)

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  13. I agree with sew journal's comment. Although Woolite is actually not the best choice for wool (it would probably be fine once or twice); it works better with synthetic fabrics. I recommend using Eucalan or Soak, both of which can be found at a knitting store near you! They don't require rinsing, so you just soak, gently remove excess water and lay flat to dry.

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  14. I might hand wash - try a no-rinse detergent like Eucalan, I love the grapefruit scent!
    http://www.eucalan.com/

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  15. Wool shrinks with a combination of heat and agitation, which is why they shrink in non-cold laundry cycles and the dryer. So cold wash with a wool specific laundry detergent and hang dry. However, the lining for your skirt may bleed even in cold, so test a swatch.

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  16. HAND WASH!!! the most important step!!!

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