27 June 2010

Thread tails.

Unless I've changed the thread or a needle, I never hang on to the thread tails when I start sewing.
Because I never have thread tails.
I chain piece everything.
And I sew through scraps at the end of a run of chain piecing.
My sewing machine, when not in use, looks soomething like this:
This started because my old machine's tension would go nuts if I proceeded in any other manner.
Now I can't imagine going back.
No holding thread tails. No trimming of dangling threads.
Also, it puts those little scraps to use before they hit the trash bin!
 Am I the only one?

24 comments:

  1. I do it, too. My machine seems to be happier that way. And lately I've been toying with that "leaders and enders" notion where each "scrap" is actually a step in a block construction for another quilt - kind of on the forever plan. But I think that might require too much forward planning.

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  2. Nope, definitely not the only one - I couldn't imagine not having my little threadsavers at the beginning and end of each chain. I do however end up with these intensely stitched little scraps that I'm almost loathe to throw out because the texture is so cool, but what on earth would I do with them?!

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  3. Why have I never thought of this? Thanks Rossie :)

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  4. I try to remember to do this. This is when I realize I have forgotten: when I am sewing half-square triangles and the fabric gets sucked down into the feed dogs. Aargh!

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  5. Yes, I learned this and do it all the time. Surely it cuts down on thread! It would be great to be so organized that extra projects were getting done at the same time but I'm not that smart! 8^)

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  6. I do this! I learned it from my local quilt shop meet. They called it a drive on.
    Heather
    http://amessworthmaking.com/

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  7. I started doing this on my old machine (30 year old mechanical Singer) and continue to on my fancy new machine. After reading about the 'leaders and enders' quilting concept, I am now putting those little scraps to good use. I cut up a bunch of my smaller scraps into 2" squares to use as my leaders and enders. After only doing a couple of projects incorporating Ls & Es, I already have a big pile of squares sewn together. Can't wait to see what they become (I'm thinking an Irish chain quilt)!

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  8. I've been using the leaders and enders approach, (when I remember, anyways) lately. I love not having the tails!

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  10. (I'll try that again!)
    You are definitely not the only one! My machine always seems to have a piece of fabric under the presser foot too!

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  11. I do this on my featherweight, but not my Bernina!!! I love all the little bits & pieces!

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  12. I always do this too! I should be more organized to have it actually be pieces that I'm sewing together, but usually it is just a thread catcher.

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  13. I really need to start doing that myself. I have an old machine and the tension drives me crazy. I'm a freak though; I'd try to save all those scraps for *something.*

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  14. I always had a "thread bunny" (piece of scrap fabric) but since reading about Leaders and Enders, I've started using those. Haven't made any projects yet but the pile grows quickly!

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  15. yup I do the same thing, I have a basket of little pieces to use and when they have to many strings, I throw them out!
    Kathie

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  16. I am trying SO hard to learn to chain piece. I just can't seem to get the concept. I'm working on it though. If someone would make a simple tutorial though, I may be able to get it! :D

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  17. Gosh I really like that yellow fabric in the last pic. What is it?
    Munaiba

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  18. I try to do this when I am piecing but sometimes forget. I love the idea of using the pieces for a project. Usually I just sew over the same one until there is no room left. Hhmmm...

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  19. I've never tried chain stitching blocks together before but that does look so much easier and no lumpy starter stitching!

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  20. I know, you are not the only one. Bonnie Hunter at quiltville.com has used this used for a long time. (Written articles, etc.) She (& others) sews a second quilt while working on the first. So while you are just sewing across a scrap, she is piecing "something else."

    I tried her method for a while, it did not work for me. Now I chain piece & try to end on actual piecwork - but I still have thread tails too...

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  21. I do this too, originally from laziness and frugality - I hate stopping to rewind the bobbin and didn't want to waste thread. Ooh and I hate when I don't leave long enough tails and the needle unthreads! Chain piecing makes life more pleasant. I don't use a scrap over and over, I just have little scraps always next to the machine and sew two of those together. Not as planned as some are talking about but by the end of an hour of piecing you can have some fun random patchwork strips!

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  22. I have always used chain piecing. I have no idea where I learned this method. Maybe it's just because I'm always trying to simplify things. And I too have a fussy machine. I sooo wish I lived in the go-to-your-talk proximity! Sounds fun and I'm sure its loaded with ideas I MUST see!

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  23. My quilting friends and I do this as well. A small square used as a foundation for string piecing works well as a leader/ender.

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  24. I learned to do this in my quilt class as well but my teacher called it a "spider" because all of the threads hanging off the little scrap looked like spider legs.

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